A study of continuous-flow electrocoagulation process to minimize chemicals dosing in the full-scale treatment of plastic plating industry wastewater

Rachmad Ardhianto, Anita Dwi Anggrainy, Ganjar Samudro, Agung Triyawan, Arseto Yekti Bagastyo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A continuous-flow electrocoagulation unit was used to replace the existing chemical coagulation in plastic plating industry wastewater treatment plants, aiming to enhance pollutant removal and cost efficiency. This study was conducted at an on-site wastewater treatment plant, with the electrocoagulation process monitored for nine consecutive months. A novel electrocoagulation unit equipped with multi-rod helical systems (i.e., made of an iron anode and a stainless-steel cathode) was used in this study, with the treatment flow adjusted to optimize the operational costs. The results indicate that energy consumption can be maintained at 7200 kWh/month while achieving >99 % removal of heavy metals (Cr, Ni, and Cu), with removal rates of 78.64 ± 0.13 mg/L.day (Cr), 105.47 ± 0.07 mg/L.day (Ni), and 38.30 ± 0.09 mg/L.day (Cu). The chemical cost was reduced by approximately 50 %. Furthermore, an over 50 % reduction in sludge production was achieved, with the acid and alkaline by-products entirely recycled. Compared to the previously applied chemical coagulation, electrocoagulation can reduce operational costs from US$ 6.11 to US$ 2.87 per m3 of wastewater treated. These results confirm that electrocoagulation can be optimized and implemented to replace conventional chemical coagulation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105217
JournalJournal of Water Process Engineering
Volume60
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

Keywords

  • Chemical coagulation
  • Electrocoagulation
  • Electrode configuration
  • Optimization
  • Plastic plating industry

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