Antiradical Efficiency of Essential Oils from Plant Seeds Obtained by Supercritical CO2, Soxhlet Extraction, and Hydrodistillation

Mumin Enis Leblebici, Siti Machmudah, Mitsuru Sasaki, Motonobu Goto*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of supercritical CO2 (SCCO2) extraction conditions (pressure and temperature) on the system performance as well as the antiradical efficiencies of the essential oils from Japanese pepper (Xanthoxylum piperitum DC.), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton), and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) seeds were investigated. A control study with the conventional Soxhlet extraction and hydrodistillation was also conducted to compare the performance of those processes. Antiradical efficiencies were investigated by utilizing 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay with a UV-vis spectrophotometer. Higher pressure and temperature had positive effects on the supercritical process performance due to higher CO2 density and substrate solubility in SCCO2. Antiradical efficiencies of cardamom and pepper were almost the same, being significantly higher than that of fennel seeds. However, this effect decreased dramatically for all the spices when the extraction method was changed to Soxhlet extraction and hydrodistillation. SCCO2 extraction was found to yield more quality and effective essential oils than Soxhlet extraction and hydrodistillation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-337
Number of pages10
JournalSeparation Science and Technology
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Japanese pepper
  • antiradical efficiency
  • cardamom
  • fennel
  • supercritical CO extraction

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