Application of Aurantiochytrium sp. L3W for food-processing wastewater treatment in combination with polyunsaturated fatty acids production for fish aquaculture

Nurlaili Humaidah, Satoshi Nakai*, Wataru Nishijima, Takehiko Gotoh, Megumi Furuta

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thraustochytrids such as Aurantiochytrium are heterotrophic microorganisms that are known to produce valuable polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). In this study, Aurantiochytrium sp. strain L3W was used to remove dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved nitrogen (DN) from bean-boiling (BB) and miso-processing (MP) wastewater and to simultaneously produce PUFAs. Strain L3W removed 52% of the DOC and 37% of the DN from sterilized BB wastewater and produced biomass that contained 137 mg/g of fatty acids (FAs), including 96.2 mg/g of DHA. Growth of strain L3W in sterilized MP wastewater resulted in the production of biomass containing 147.6 mg/g of FAs, including 97.8 mg/g of DHA, and removal of 47% of the DOC and 55% of the DN from the wastewater. The biomass of strain L3W was digestible by the enzymes extracted from the stomachs of rainbow trout. These results confirmed the potential for use of strain L3W to remove DOC and DN from food processing wastewater and to produce PUFAs. This study also provided the first evidence that the raw biomass of Aurantiochytrium sp. can be used as a fish feed additive.

Original languageEnglish
Article number140735
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume743
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Aurantiochytrium sp.
  • Bean-boiling wastewater
  • Digestion enzyme
  • Miso-processing wastewater
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acid

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