Enhanced oil removal by graphene oxide/N,N′-methylene bisacrylamide modified magnetite-cellulose aerogel derived from ramie stem waste: Adsorption performance, kinetics, and economical analysis

Maktum Muharja*, Sofiatul Hasanah, Difka Augustina Diana Sari, M. Khoirunnafiuddin, Siska Nuri Fadilah, Rizki Fitria Darmayanti, Dendy Satrio, Maya Ismayati

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Oil spills in the sea pose grave environmental and health risks. The discovery of novel methods to remove oil from water has been the focus of numerous investigations, however they are having trouble scaling up. This study focuses on a modified adsorbent made from graphene oxide (GO) and N,N′-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA) sourced from waste ramie stems, designed for oil-seawater mixtures with high-capacity and reusable aerogels. A synthesized aerogel included ramie pulp dissolution in NaOH-urea, with additions of Fe3O4, potassium peroxydisulfate, GO, and MBA at 1–13 g/L concentrations. Treatments involved ultrasonication, coagulation, solvent exchange, and coating, resulting in a hydrophobic aerogel with a 117.46° contact angle. A maximum 5.81 g/g adsorption capacity was observed at 13 g/L MBA. MBA improved pore count and size, raising adsorption. MBA increased aerogel porosity from 0.873 to 0.898 and decreased density from 0.193 to 0.159 g·cm−3. GO bolstered aerogel structure, rendering it reusable for two cycles. This sustainable, cost-effective, magnetite cellulose aerogel could offer a biodegradable cellulose-based sorbents for oil spill challenges.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101645
JournalBioresource Technology Reports
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Adsorbent
  • Graphene oxide
  • Methylene bisacrylamide
  • Oil spill
  • Ramie stem

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