Indonesian martial artists’ preferences in martial arts schools: Sustaining business competitiveness through conjoint analysis

Yogi Tri Prasetyo*, Maela Madel L. Cahigas, Eugene Patrick, Michael Rodney, Reny Nadlifatin, Satria Fadil Persada

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The popularity of martial arts in the present times has become apparent, therefore, it is necessary to explore martial artists’ preferences and the schools’ competitiveness. The purpose of this study was to assess martial artists’ preferences concerning the services offered by martial arts schools. Conjoint analysis was utilized to analyze the responses of fifty-five (55) martial artists based on the seven (7) martial arts schools’ attributes. The results showed that the type of martial arts was found to be the most important attribute (30.449%) followed by distance (27.970%), price range (22.706%), social environment (11.097%), class preference (5.080%), goal (1.562%), and schedule (1.135%). Furthermore, Muay Thai or Kickboxing was the most preferred martial art, Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) was the second priority, next was Taekwondo, then Karate, and finally Boxing. In addition, the martial artists’ preferred distance was less than 8 km, and a monthly training cost of 150,000 to 450,000 IDR (10 to 20 USD). Martial artists liked attending open classes, treated martial arts as a hobby, and favored attending classes once or twice weekly. With the lack of conjoint-related studies in the martial arts industry, the findings contributed to academicians and addressed issues of inadequate studies. Most importantly, the researchers presented managerial implications to leverage marketing techniques and develop the business operations of martial arts schools.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0301229
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume19
Issue number4 April
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

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