Recent progress on drugs discovery study for treatment of COVID-19: repurposing existing drugs and current natural bioactive molecules

Ika Oktavianawati, Mardi Santoso, Mohd Fadzelly Abu Bakar, Yong Ung Kim, Sri Fatmawati*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

COVID-19 has been a major global health concern for the past three years, and currently we are still experiencing coronavirus patients in the following years. The virus, known as SARS-CoV-2, shares a similar genomic identity with previous viruses such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. To combat the pandemic, modern drugs discovery techniques such as in silico experiments for docking and virtual screening have been employed to design new drugs against COVID-19. However, the release of new drugs for human use requires two safety assessment steps consisting of preclinical and clinical trials. To bypass these steps, scientists are exploring the potential of repurposing existing drugs for COVID-19 treatment. This approach involves evaluating antiviral activity of drugs previously used for treating respiratory diseases against other enveloped viruses such as HPV, HSV, and HIV. The aim of this study is to review repurposing of existing drugs, traditional medicines, and active secondary metabolites from plant-based natural products that target specific protein enzymes related to SARS-CoV-2. The review also analyzes the chemical structure and activity relationship between selected active molecules, particularly flavonol groups, as ligands and proteins or active sites of SARS-CoV-2.

Original languageEnglish
Article number89
JournalApplied Biological Chemistry
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Antiviral agents
  • COVID-19
  • Coronavirus
  • Natural products
  • Repurposing drugs
  • SARS-CoV-2

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